3 Tips to Increase Your Deadlift

Jun 1st, 2015

Category: Zone Tips

3 Tips to Increase Your Deadlift

-The deadlift is the king of posterior chain exercises and in my opinion is one of the most impressive displays of physical strength.
-The deadlift is one of the most basic exercises to perform, simply lift a heavy object from the ground to your hips. The deadlift develops the muscles of the hamstrings, glutes, back, and forearms.
 -Getting strong in the deadlift can help you build lean muscle, run faster, jump higher, but the biggest benefit is maintaining the functional ability to lift something heavy from the ground pain free!

 

Here are three tips to help you get stronger and master the deadlift.

 

Tip #1:  Take Out the Slack

One of the biggest mistakes I see a person make while deadlifting is trying to rip the bar from the ground with no tension between them and the bar. Doing this causes you to lose an optimal position of leverage and puts you into a potentially hazardous position of poor leverage. Instead get into a good starting position, create tension between you and the weight and drive through the floor to start the pull.
Practice creating tension at the beginning of your pull on every rep, and soon you’ll master the starting position of the deadlift.

Tip #2: Strengthen your Start

Strengthen your start by performing deadlifts from an elevated position. Deficit deadlifts will increase your low back strength and your ability to hold a good starting position during regular deadlifts. Start by adding a small deficit (1-2 inches) and work up to a large deficit (4-6 inches), you can stand on plates, stacked sheets of plywood, or a small box.  Start with lighter weight and increase your weight, as long you can maintain good position. Use moderate to low repetition ranges for deficit deadlifts (3-8 reps).
Master pulling from a deficit and your regular deadlift will become stronger and more structurally sound.

Tip #3: Strengthen your Lockout

Strengthen your lockout by performing rack pulls and barbell hip thrusts. Rack pulls and barbell hip thrusts will strengthen your glutes and back to be able to lockout heavy weight in the deadlift. Rack pulls should be performed from above the knee. You will be able to work up to heavier weights then in the regular deadlift, but you should start with moderate weight and work your way up. Use moderate to low repetition ranges for rack pulls (3-8 reps).
Barbell hip thrusts are performed with your back up against a bench, barbell resting on your hips, knees bent and your feet flat on the ground. You should be able to work up to your heaviest deadlift weight, but start with moderate weight and make sure you achieve full hip extension with every rep. Use high to moderate repetition ranges for barbell hip thrusts (6-12 reps) with a 1-2 second pause at the top. Get stronger with these lifts and you’ll be locking out new PR’s in the deadlift.

Summary

The deadlift is the king of posterior chain exercises and is one of the most impressive feats of physical strength.  Pull from an optimal position of leverage by creating tension between yourself and the bar before initiating the pull. Increase your starting strength in the deadlift by incorporating deficit deadlifts into your routine.
Achieve the ability to lockout heavier weights in the deadlift by incorporating rack pulls and barbell hip thrusts into your routine. Use these tips to increase your deadlift numbers and in turn add slabs of lean muscle, improve athletic performance, and most importantly stay functional for life!